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Philodendron Xanadu

Philodendron Xanadu

Add some latino flare to your home with the Philodendron Xanadu. Native to Brazil this Araceae practically bounces with tropical delight. With it’s sleek long stems and heavy flared leaves it’s not hard to imagine this specimen samba-ing through your living room.

The Philodendron Xanadu belongs to one of three subgenera within the Philodendron genus named Meconostigma. As part of the Araceae family you might already know its brother; Monstera Deliciosa. Other than the Monstera, the Xanadu is not a vine, but grows upright to form wide dense clumps of green foliage. They are very easy to care for and grow prettier with age.

Philodendron xanadu
Philodendron xanadu

The Philodendron Xanadu are said to tolerate low light conditions but the plant will be much less dens with long stems and smaller and sadder leaves. So if you want it to really dance, place it an area with lots of bright natural light (preferably diffused or it may develop leaf burn or Chlorosis). Enough sun will also keep the stem from rotting, given that you water it at moderate intervals.

Philodendron xanadu
Philodendron xanadu
Philodendron

Caring for your Philodendron Xanadu

Location: Bright area with lots of indirect or diffused sunlight

Water: Give it a good soak when watering and wait until the soil is completely dry to the touch before watering again. The number of days will depend on the temperature and location of the plant in your home but usually it’s no more than once a week.

Propagation: A happy Philodendron Xanadu will grow fairly quickly, forming many new stems and eventually becoming too big or top-heavy for it’s pot. This allows you to propagate by division. To do this, remove the entire plant from its pot and gently divide the root cluster into sections using your hands or a small shovel. Then you can re pot each section in its own container in well draining potting soil.

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Philodendron Rojo Congo

Philodendron Rojo Congo

Say hello to my new friend Philodendron Rojo Congo. We met a couple of weeks ago, when this curiously coloured character found its way onto my desk. It took me several google attempts to ascertain it’s species, but I wasn’t completely surprised to discovered it to be yet another Philodendron – the Araceae family does after all, have close to 500 different species.

The Philodendron Rojo Congo can be identified by the bright red colour of young foliage. As the plant ages, the lance shape leafs turn a deeper darker green while the leaf stems retain their deep Auburn hue.

 
Philodendron Rojo Congo Plant
Philodendron Rojo Congo

Philodendron Rojo Congo

 

From the ancient Greek “philos” which means “love” and “dendron”, meaning “tree”, the name philodendron describes the species’ propensity for winding around trees. But unlike it’s brother Monstera, the Rojo does not share this climbing character. Instead, like the Xanadu, this philodendron is self-heading, which means it grows upwards and outwards.

 
Philodendron Rojo
Philodendron Leaf
 

Native to South America, the Rojo Congo prefers partial to shady areas but does not tolerate cold temperatures. This low maintenance perennial makes an excellent houseplant thanks to its sculptural appearance and good looks, plus it keeps the air clean while doing so.

Caring for your Philodendron Rojo Congo

Names: Philodendron Rojo Congo.
Family: Araceae, native to South America.
Water: Regular or weekly interval, ensuring the soil remains moist, but never soggy.
Location: Shady, temperate areas. Diffused natural or indirect sunlight like a northern exposure as direct sun will cause leaf burn.
Soil: Fast draining acidic to neutral soil.
Toxicity: Toxic to pets and children.

 
Philodendron Rojo Congo
Philodendron Rojo Congo
 

Troubleshooting

Soft green droopy leaves:Your plant needs some water. Give if a good dousing and it should perk up quickly.
Yellow droopy leaves: Could be due to overwatering. Check your pot to ensure that it drains well and that your plant is not sitting in water. Always feel the soil with your finger before water. If the soil is wet, or moist, do not add water – this will cause the roots to rot.
Brown crispy spots on leaves: Leaf burn from too much direct sun. Move your plant to a bright but not sunny spot with indirect light.
Few leafs dropping off at the bottom but the other leafs look healthy: A healthy plant will at times drop off older leaves. If the rest of the plant is healthy, it should not cause worries.
Saggy, drooping leaves even after watering: Your plant may at some point get too big for its pot. If the plant looks otherwise healthy, but a little lethargic, consider wether it might be time to give it a slightly larger home. If this is not the case a nitrogen fertiliser could help rejuvenate it.

 

Potted Philodendron Rojo Congo

 

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Story + Photos by Barbara Cilliers